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Resource Center

The ASERT Resource Center serves as Pennsylvania’s leading source for up-to-date and accurate information and resources for individuals with autism, their families, the community and the professionals who support them. Contact the ASERT resource center to speak with a resource specialist who can help you learn how to discover and access resources in Pennsylvania. The resource center is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

When should I contact the Resource Center?

If you have additional questions about information you found on PAautism.org or would like to invite an outreach specialist to attend an event, conference, or support group, someone at the resource center can assist you.

Be sure to visit the following pages below here on PAautism.org to find helpful information. If you still have additional questions, contact the Resource Center.

By phone
M-F 8:00am to 5:00pm EST
1-877-231-4244

Are you located outside of Pennsylvania?
The ASERT resource center is focused on specific resources in Pennsylvania. If you are in another state, the resources specialists will not be able to help you. Please visit the resources section of PAautism.org, as some of the online resources may be applicable to residents of other states.

           

Back to School Jitters

Guest Post Written by Erin Farrell, M.Ed, LBS, Mother.

Going back to school can be a nerve-wracking time for both parents and children.  There are new friends, new teachers, new schedules, and new routines.  For every child this can be stressful; but for a child with autism it can present other challenges.  In my household, there are five children to get prepared for the upcoming school year.  Two are my 9-year-old twins with autism, Gavin and Connor.  Both boys are already voicing concerns about the new grade they will be going to and each day the thought of 4th grade is getting more real.  I wanted to put together a top five tips that go into our kid's transition into the new school year.  So here goes!

1.    All right everyone – get your papers in order for the upcoming IEP meetings. Use this beginning of the year timing to familiarize yourself with your child’s team and let them know how big of a player you are alongside them.

2.    Brush up on your acronyms. Your kiddo may need the school BCBA to eventually conduct an FBA so that the teachers can all have a consistent BIPThere are a lot of acronyms but check out this sheet by ASERT that will help!

3.    If your child is receiving wraparound support (also known as Behavioral Health Rehabilitation Services or BHRS) like my guys, you’re more than likely going to have to schedule some type of re-evaluation right before the beginning of the school year to ensure a continuance of services.

4.    Go over timelines often to provide additional structure and preparation for your children. Have a calendar for you and your kids to look at as you are planning for school to start.  The calendar shows the first day of school as a circled day, so everyone can have a visual as to how many days are left in summer vacation.

5.    If your child is interested, allow them to be a part of the school supply shopping so that they can rock the new pencil box and bookbag in style. Sometimes our kids may be interested in things that other children their age dislike but don’t worry--let them be themselves! (I think my kids will continue to sport Mario Brothers until 12th grade and I’m totally okay with it).




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